No More Jobs – What to Do About It

First world problems - cookie too big to fit in milk glass

This is part of a series: No More Jobs

Unless civilization collapses, robots will eventually make us all unemployable.  I’m trying to figure out the least-bad way to do it.

Today, I’ll list some things that I think will help.  None of these even come close to solving the problems that universal automation causes, but they’ll help.  I’ll also list some things that I don’t want to properly endorse, but I think will do more good than bad.

Continue reading No More Jobs – What to Do About It

No More Jobs – What I Think Will Actually Happen

Insanely expensive reclining chair

This is part of a series: No More Jobs

I’m trying to figure out the least-bad way to replace everybody’s jobs with robots.  Thus far, I’ve explained why I disagree with 2 of the most optimistic views on universal automation, and I tried to figure out the unrealistic ideal.  Now I’ll list what I think will actually happen.

Continue reading No More Jobs – What I Think Will Actually Happen

No More Jobs – Won’t it be Good if Robots do All Our Work?

Well...somebody was bored...

This is part of a series: No More Jobs

Ever feel chained to the office?  Bolted to the assembly line?  How would you like to be freed from bondage to work?  Imagine, if you can, working a 0-hour week, every week.

Unless civilization collapses, engineers will eventually make this possible.  Imagine:

  • No poverty
  • No drudgery
  • Freedom to be with your friends and family
  • Freedom to do whatever you want
  • And you could have nearly anything you want, just by ordering it

This sounds like utopia, and therein lies the problem: utopia is literally “no place”.  So what’s the catch?  Without any need to work, we’ll also have: Continue reading No More Jobs – Won’t it be Good if Robots do All Our Work?

No More Jobs – What if Technology Creates More Jobs than it Destroys?

This is part of a series: No More Jobs

In my previous post, I said that robots will eventually take all our jobs.  In this post, I’ll cover the view that robots create jobs more than they destroy.

It seems to me that this view is fairly common among people in industries that benefit from automation – computing, robotics, electronics, etc.  This makes sense – those who benefit from automation are more likely to see it as a good thing.

“But wait”, say those who lost their jobs to robots, “replacing a human with a robot destroys a job.  How can it create them?”  They answer that it makes companies more efficient, and allows them to lower prices.  Even though many people lose their jobs because of automation in – for example – car factories, everyone else gets to enjoy lower prices.  They then have more money to spend, which gives employers a big incentive to hire more people.  Workers in 1 sector of industry suffer, while everyone else benefits. Continue reading No More Jobs – What if Technology Creates More Jobs than it Destroys?

They’re Coming to Take Your Job

McDonald's Robot

This is part of a series: No More Jobs

Face it: they really are going to take your job.

I’m not talking about immigrants, I’m talking about robots.  Unless civilization collapses, engineers will eventually figure out how to replace everyone with unpaid robots.  So what’s the least bad way to do it?

In this series, I’ll cover some of the main schools of thought about universal automation.  I’ll then describe the unrealistic ideal, what most people will actually do, and what the more selfless people on planet earth can do to make the domination of automation work out as well as practical.

Photo credit:

This is part of a series: No More Jobs

Testing Evolution – How to Do It

Sketch by Leonardo da Vinci

This is part of a series: Testing Evolution

This post is mainly written for anyone who wants to duplicate my results.  I’ll try to make it accessible to non-geeks, but there are a lot of technical details.

Summary:

  • I used an evolution simulator to test evolution because that was the easiest way to do it with my skill set
  • My big insight: mutation and natural selection are, for lack of a better term, platform-independent
  • I clarify what exactly mutation and natural selection are, and why I can do the same process to self-copying programs
  • I give examples of other evolutionary algorithms, to give an idea of what most of their authors’ goals are and how they write them
  • I list the main differences between my algorithm and most evolutionary algorithms
    1. They do artificial selection, while mine does natural selection
    2. They usually make their creatures a collection of settings or useful attributes, while I made mine actual programs written in a general-purpose programming language
    3. They mutate as few things as practical, while mine mutates the entire creature’s source code
    4. They reward small, but insignificant improvements, while mine only rewards changes that significantly improve a creature’s ability to spread its genes
    5. They put the creature copier in the simulator, while I put it in each creature

I wanted to test Atheism by testing evolution, but I needed to decide how.

Continue reading Testing Evolution – How to Do It